demand

McKnight’s Long-Term Care News

The demand for skilled care workers will grow by 13% through 2026, according to the most recent Bureau of Labor projections.

Overall, job growth in the healthcare sector is predicted to triple the pace seen in the rest of the nation’s economy.

Continued expansion will reflect “efforts to shift care to the community and out of hospitals,” reported Edward Salsberg, faculty member at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services and School of Nursing, and Robert Martiniano, M.D., project lead at the Center for Health Workforce Studies. Hospital employment is projected to grow 7% the next decade. Conversely, home healthcare and practices are expected to grow most rapidly, by 54% and 21%, respectively, by 2026.

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Pharmacy Choice

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer today launched a major effort to urge his colleagues in both the Senate and House of Representatives to immediately pass the Physician Shortage Act of 2017. Schumer explained that this critical legislation will add 15,000 more Medicare-supported residency training slots for doctors, helping to ensure teaching hospitals can train enough physicians to meet the growing demands for physicians as our nation is already in the midst of a doctor shortage. According to the Association of American Medical Colleges, the U.S. is expected to face a shortage of up to 43,100 primary care physicians and 61,800 specialty physicians by 2030…

…Additionally, a recent major report for the Center for Health Workforce Studies (CHWSNY) found that providers are unevenly distributed across New York, with the Southern Tier often having far fewer physicians than it needs.

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FierceHealthcare.com

In theory it should be easy for hospitals and health systems to hire nurses. Despite a shortage of nurses in the health workforce, there is a growing pool of potential candidates to fill open slots. Yet it can take healthcare organizations as long as 50 days to hire a registered nurse. There are several reasons for the hiring delays, according to an article from The Pew Charitable Trusts. Many hospitals and healthcare systems seek out nursing job applicants with a bachelor’s degree or other advanced degrees, as well as work experience. Yet in some states, many nurses entering the workforce may need only their nursing license to apply for jobs. In states like New York, for instance, registered nurses outnumber the available positions, so providers have raised the bar and now require a bachelor’s degree, as Jean Moore, director of the Center for Health Workforce Studies at the University of Albany, told Pew.

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Lohud – The Journal News

You may want to consider acting on that toothache you’ve been ignoring for six months, or soon the soreness in the back of your mouth could be compounded by a new headache: Finding a dentist. According to a report from the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, New York state may face a shortage of dentists as early as 2025, as demand is expected to far outpace supply, with 1,024 fewer full-time dentists than needed. This is expected to become the third highest state shortage in the country.

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Health Affairs Blog

For several decades, there has been a general consensus that the nation would benefit from an increased supply of primary care practitioners, including physicians. Most reform efforts to improve health care, including the Affordable Care Act (ACA), have viewed an increased focus on primary care as essential for improving the delivery system and outcomes of care. According to the Center for Health Workforce Studies (CHWS) demand index, these efforts are beginning to pay off.

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MedicalExpress.com

The health care sector is expected to grow about 22 percent between 2014 and 2024, according to a new UAlbany CHWS report. Between 2004 and 2014, jobs in the health care sector grew 20 percent, compared to three percent for all other sectors, according to a recent report by the University at Albany’s Center for Health Workforce Studies (CHWS). The trend is expected to continue as the health care industry is projected to grow much faster than other industries through the next decade as well.

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Utica Observer-Dispatch

Help wanted: health care workers with a desire to provide critical information to aid patient diagnosis. Bachelor’s degree required. Average hourly wage of $28.30 in the Mohawk Valley. The position in question is a clinical laboratory technologist, and too few candidates are applying for the available jobs leaving the field with lots of vacancies and an aging workforce.

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Albany Times Union

In keeping with a growing demand for primary care doctors, job opportunities for the family practice physicians outweighed those for specialists last year, according to a study released Friday by the University at Albany’s Center for Health Workforce Studies. The overall marketplace for new doctors appears strong, according to Trends in Demands for New Physicians, 2010-2014.

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Poughkeepsie Journal

The number of nursing graduates in New York statehas spiked over the past decade, and hospitals in the mid-Hudson Valley are benefiting. The number of registered nurses graduating each year has more than doubled since 2002, according to a new report by the University at Albany’s Center for Health Workforce Studies.

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