Female physicians make $37K less in their first job (and it’s not just because of specialty choice)

Advisory Board

Female physicians on average are paid $37,000 less than male physicians in their first job after finishing their residencies or fellowships—and the gap cannot be fully explained by seemingly obvious causes, such as practice area and a desire to have greater control over work-life balance, according to a study published last week in Health Affairs.

For the study, researchers examined the unconditional mean starting compensation of more than 16,000 individuals who finished their residency training or fellowships from 1999 through 2017. The researchers reviewed data from the University at Albany, State University of New York‘s Center for Health Workforce Studies’ New York Survey of Residents Completing Training.

The researchers in the study wrote that they focused on “information about new physicians accepting their first non-training position” because it “minimizes unobserved differences in productivity and work experience that may confound analyses of a wider range of physician seniority.”

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