In the News

The Altamont Enterprise

BERNE — Jill Martin, a nurse practitioner who made it her mission to bring medical care back to the Hilltowns, announced this week that her practice, Hilltown Healthcare, PLLC, will open its doors on Dec. 2, 2019.

Martin is certified through the American Nurses Credentialing Center and as of now is the sole certified medical practitioner at Hilltown Healthcare. She told The Enterprise in an email that she has been interviewing candidates interested in joining the team and plans to make a hiring decision “in the near future.”…

… The Health Resources and Services Administration website ranks the number of physicians as the highest-impact condition. Poverty, infant health, senior citizens, and travel time to the nearest source of care are all equal below that.

Hammond wrote that the Hilltowns submitted its application on Aug. 1. Because the Center for Health Workforce Studies requested, on behalf of the state’s health department, that the federal Health Resources and Services Administration expedite the application, it was approved on Oct. 2, just two months later. The designation does not need to be renewed.

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Dentistry Today

Many of the factual points Dr. Michael Davis made in his August 19 article, “Dental Hygienists Face Temp Employment Difficulties,” are well taken. But I believe that the outlook for the dental hygiene profession, viewed holistically from the national perspective, is not as dire as depicted. In addition, respectfully, some of the language used to describe the challenges to dental hygienists is quite strong in the absence of citations…

…Dental support organizations (DSOs) also offer opportunities for dental hygienists that may not exist in a traditional dental hygiene position in a private practice dental office. They allow for career growth beyond clinical practice for those who want to pursue a role in administration, for example. According to the Oral Health Workforce Research Center at the SUNY Albany School of Public Health, DSOs are attractive to dental hygienists who desire employee benefits such as health insurance and retirement plans.

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The Nation’s Health

The U.S. dental workforce is welcoming more women into its ranks, which could have implications for access to oral health care.

In July, the University of Albany’s Oral Health Workforce Research Center released a new study on the demographics of women in dentistry and the related potential impacts for underserved communities.

According to the study, in 2016, nearly 30% of all U.S. dentists were women, compared to 24% in 2010. Overall, women dentists were also younger and more diverse than men in the field, with higher proportions of black, Hispanic and foreign-trained dentists. Women dentists were also more likely to serve young patients, practice in urban areas and care for patients with public insurance coverage, such as Medicaid.

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Dentistry Today

Primary care postgraduate dental training programs supported by competitive Health Resources and Service Administration (HRSA) grant funding play a significant role in providing care to underserved populations, according to a study from the Oral Health Workforce Research Center (OHWRC) at the University at Albany’s Center for Health Workforce Studies

…“While this research is limited to a subset of HRSA’s overall investments, the study clearly shows the impact of federal funding on building institutional capacity to produce a sufficient dental workforce to meet the demand in primary care dentistry,” said OHWRC investigator Elizabeth Mertz. “The graduates of these programs are contributing in large measure to the oral healthcare of vulnerable and underserved patients in the US.”

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Ithaca.com

An innovative training program bringing medical residents to Cayuga Medical Center in 2019 for their residencies will help attract new primary care physicians to the region. With more primary care physicians, patients will find it easier to schedule medical visits and enroll as new patients with medical practices…

…Tompkins and nearby counties face a growing shortage of primary care physicians. A 2017 study by the School of Public Health at the State University of New York at Albany found large differences in where primary care physicians practice in the eight-county Southern Tier region. The area’s urban counties of Tompkins, Broome and Chemung have one primary care physician for about every 900 residents. In the region’s five rural counties, there is one primary care physician for about every 1,700 residents. Community health planners predict a growing shortage of primary care doctors in all Southern Tier counties as the region’s existing physicians retire, and its demographics shift to an older population needing more primary health care services.

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Dentistry Today

Dentistry has seen significant changes in the demographics of those who practice, particularly when it comes to gender, according to the Oral Health Workforce Research Center (OHWRC) at the University at Albany’s Center for Health Workforce Studies (CHWS).

Collaborating with the ADA, the OHWRC studied differences in dental practice characteristics and service delivery by gender to anticipate changes that might affect the availability of dental services for underserved populations in the future.

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Becker’s Dental and DSO Review

More women are entering the dental field compared to past years, according to a study conducted by the American Dental Association and the University of Albany (N.Y.) Center for Health Workforce Studies.

The study, published July 11, evaluated the differences in dental practice characteristics and service delivery by gender.

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DrBicuspid.com

The number of US pediatric dentists is expected to grow by more than 60% through 2030, according to new research commissioned by the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD). Without major policy shifts, this drastic increase in supply could overtake demand for services.

The dental industry is in a time of transition — more dentists are postponing retirement and an increasing number of students are enrolled in dental school. A study published in the July issue of the Journal of the American Dental Association explored how these trends may affect pediatric dentistry (July 2019, Vol. 150:7, pp. 609-617).

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13WHAM

Rochester, N.Y. – Friday was Match Day at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry. Nearly 100 students have been placed in programs to complete their residency training in 27 states…

…According to data from the Center for Health Workforce Studies, when surrounded counties are included, the number of primary care doctors per patient drops.

But compared to the state, the finger lakes region has more primary care doctors that some other parts of the state.

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Buffalo.edu

BUFFALO, N.Y. — Nearly twice as many students from underrepresented groups enrolled in the class of 2022 at the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University at Buffalo than in the previous year.

According to data from the Office of Medical Admissions at the Jacobs School, 33 students out of 180 students in the Class of 2022 are from underrepresented groups. The previous year, the first year that the Jacobs School’s incoming class size increased from 144 to 180, there were 18 students from underrepresented groups.

“Last year, we had a total of 18 underrepresented students, so we have almost doubled the number this year,” said Dori Marshall, MD, associate dean of admissions at the Jacobs School and clinical assistant professor of psychiatry…

…Even in a diverse state like New York, where African-Americans and Hispanics/Latinos comprise more than 30 percent of the population, she added, they make up just 12 percent of the state’s physician workforce, according to data from the SUNY Albany Center for Health Workforce Studies.

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