In the News

Watchdog.org

Discounting the governor and the state flag, there isn’t much that the secluded backwoods of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula have in common with the urban streets of Detroit. One thing they do have in common: not enough dentists. In all but seven of Michigan’s 83 counties, there is at least one area experiencing a shortage of dental professionals. It’s a truly statewide problem, one that affects a disproportionate number of children and low-income households.

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Kentucky Center for Economic Policy

The proposed changes to Kentucky’s Medicaid expansion include the elimination of dental coverage from the package of benefits for adults. Reducing access to dental care would likely lead to other, more serious health problems and cost the state more in overall Medicaid spending through greater use of emergency room services. Dental care makes up a small portion of the overall budget, but is a very efficient preventative medical service that is critical in Kentucky given our poor oral health.

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Albany Times Union

The University of Albany’s School of Public Health conducts periodic reports on the health care workforce. And while it shouldn’t come as a surprise that the job market is good for newly minted physicians, there are what could be seen as a couple of surprises tucked into the study.

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MedicalExpress.com

The health care sector is expected to grow about 22 percent between 2014 and 2024, according to a new UAlbany CHWS report. Between 2004 and 2014, jobs in the health care sector grew 20 percent, compared to three percent for all other sectors, according to a recent report by the University at Albany’s Center for Health Workforce Studies (CHWS). The trend is expected to continue as the health care industry is projected to grow much faster than other industries through the next decade as well.

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Health News Digest

ALBANY, N.Y. — Between 2004 and 2014, jobs in the health care sector grew 20 percent, compared to three percent for all other sectors, according to a recent report by the University at Albany’s Center for Health Workforce Studies (CHWS). The trend is expected to continue as the health care industry is projected to grow much faster than other industries through the next decade as well.

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The Pew Charitable Trusts

Poor dental health continues to be a problem throughout Kentucky, but the situation is particularly severe for low-income residents, people living in rural areas, the elderly, pregnant women, and people with special needs, according to a report released on Feb. 24 2016 by the Center for Health Workforce Studies at the University at Albany.

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Insider Louisville

There is some good news when it comes to dental health in Kentucky, according to a new report from the Center for Health Workforce Studies at the University of Albany. The study was financed in part by the Pew Charitable Trust and was compiled using interviews with stakeholders with an interest in oral health in Kentucky.

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PBS Kentucky Educational Television

As the saying goes, what gets measured, gets changed. While the oral health status of Kentuckians is widely acknowledged as needing improvement, the hard numbers to support this claim have not been aggregated and presented to the public in a comprehensive way – until now.

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