job market

HealthNewsDigest.com

The Exit Survey, conducted annually since 1998 (excluding 2004 and 2006), provides an overview of the outcomes of training and the demand for new physicians. Among the key data points tracked by the survey include physician job market assessments, demand based on areas of specialization, and the likelihood of physicians practicing in New York after completing training.

The demand for primary care physicians has outpaced demand for specialists every year since 2008. Primary care physicians were less likely than their specialist counterparts to report difficulty in finding a satisfactory job; they received more job offers than specialists and had a more positive assessment of the regional job market. Also of note, the average increase in median starting income was four percent for primary care physicians versus 3 percent for specialists from 2012 through 2016.

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PBS Newshour

Question: As a health care professional, I’m fed up with the “talent shortage.” If there’s a shortage, why do nurses like me also work as waitresses, and make more than we could make nursing, which I’m certified in? I also have a college degree, because I was told it was a necessity to compete today. One interview after another is a waste of time, with HR telling me I look good and to expect a callback that never comes. I got a couple of actual offers and one contract assignment, but I could walk dogs and make more. Hospitals just wait for somebody who will work for peanuts. And they are rude. My dream was to build a good career as a nurse and to get paid. Does anybody want to hire a registered nurse for a living wage?

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PewTrusts.org

HOUSTON — The skyscrapers at the Texas Medical Center are filled with hospital beds. The commuters waiting in the heat for the train wear scrubs. The young woman dodging traffic on a bicycle may be studying to be a doctor, a nurse or a dentist. Houston is known for its energy jobs, but registered nurses are the most in-demand workers in town. “Whatever jobs we have, we keep expanding. And our competitors are doing the same,” said Thomas Vernon, a human resources director for Houston Methodist, which has a large hospital at the medical complex here. Last year the health system hired about 1,200 nurses across its seven hospitals.

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FierceHealthcare.com

In theory it should be easy for hospitals and health systems to hire nurses. Despite a shortage of nurses in the health workforce, there is a growing pool of potential candidates to fill open slots. Yet it can take healthcare organizations as long as 50 days to hire a registered nurse. There are several reasons for the hiring delays, according to an article from The Pew Charitable Trusts. Many hospitals and healthcare systems seek out nursing job applicants with a bachelor’s degree or other advanced degrees, as well as work experience. Yet in some states, many nurses entering the workforce may need only their nursing license to apply for jobs. In states like New York, for instance, registered nurses outnumber the available positions, so providers have raised the bar and now require a bachelor’s degree, as Jean Moore, director of the Center for Health Workforce Studies at the University of Albany, told Pew.

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The Desert Sun

As the population in the Coachella Valley gets bigger and older, competent heath care workers can expect a reasonable level of job security and decent wages. That’s the message of an ongoing effort to encourage more local high school students to go after careers in health and medicine. The push includes health academies at seven local high schools that pair students with internships in the health care sector.

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Lohud, The Journal News

The number of registered nurses graduating each year from New York colleges has more than doubled since the height of a nursing shortage in 2002, according to a new report. The survey of in-state colleges by the University at Albany’s Center for Health Workforce Studies showed the number of nursing graduations has increased in each of the past 13 years, from a low of 5,128 in 2002 to 11,141 last year.

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Poughkeepsie Journal

The number of nursing graduates in New York statehas spiked over the past decade, and hospitals in the mid-Hudson Valley are benefiting. The number of registered nurses graduating each year has more than doubled since 2002, according to a new report by the University at Albany’s Center for Health Workforce Studies.

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