In the News

LI Herald

Keeping up with demand for highly skilled nurses has not been easy for many hospitals, though. Long-term shortages have plagued the profession in the past, according to a 2016 study by the Center for Health Workforce Studies at the State University of New York at Albany. Demand is expected to become increasingly acute in the coming decades.

The first baby boomers turned 65 in 2011, according to the Centers for Disease Control. The baby-boom generation, born between 1946 and 1963, was, until the millennials, the largest generation in U.S. history. As of 2014, there were some 76.4 million boomers, according to the census.

Never before has the U.S. seen such a large generation of people growing older. On top of that, exponential advances in medical technology are expected to keep boomers alive longer than previous generations.

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U.S  News & World Report

When hospital administrators insist on paying male physicians more money – even when female physicians have more experience, credentials and training – maybe it’s a reflex, like the knee-hammer test.

Time and time again, women physicians receive smaller salaries and lower signing bonuses than men, says Dr. Roberta Gebhard, president-elect of the American Medical Women’s Association and co-chair of AMWA’s gender equity task force.

In her task force role, Gebhard hears from women physicians, including full professors, who mentor male medical students only to learn they’re already earning much more straight out of their residency programs. She’s suffered from blatant pay inequities in her own career.

Pay gaps between newly trained male and female physicians aren’t only persisting – they’re growing, according to an analysis by the Center for Health Workforce Studies using data from the annual New York Resident Exit Survey.

On average, male physicians’ starting income was some $26,000 more than females’ in 2016. This gap was less than $10,000 in 2005, then up to nearly $12,000 by 2010. Gender wage gaps also showed up by specialty. Women dermatologists earned nearly $80,000 less, cardiologists earned about $64,000 less and emergency medicine physicians about $35,000 less than their early-career male counterparts.

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Becker’s Hospital Review

Healthcare jobs are expected to grow significantly faster than the rest of the economy over the next decade, according to an analysis of Bureau of Labor Statistics data.

For the analysis, researchers with the Center for Health Workforce Studies — a part of the School of Public Health at the University at Albany-State University of New York — examined Bureau of Labor Statistics employment data for 2006-16 and employment projections made by the bureau for 2016-26.

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McKnight’s Long-Term Care News

Skilled nursing facilities’ share of the healthcare workforce will shrink by 2026 even as its employee numbers grow, according to new projections built on Bureau of Labor data…

…“Over the decade (between 2006 and 2016), jobs in healthcare settings grew more the 20 percent, while jobs in the remainder of the economy only grew 3 percent.”

Healthcare job growth will diminish a bit through the current decade being studied, but it will still far outstrip the rest of the economy at 18% vs. 6%.

The Center for Health Workforce Studies, based at the School of Public Health of the University at Albany, reported its 2016–26 projections in advance of the Health Affairs blog.

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University at Buffalo

BUFFALO, N.Y. — Medical school is a daunting financial proposition for anyone, but for those from underrepresented groups it can be a deal-breaker.

That financial barrier is one of the major factors leading to the lack of physicians from underrepresented groups. Even in a diverse state like New York, where African-Americans and Hispanics/Latinos comprise more than 30 percent of the population, they make up only 12 percent of the physician workforce, according to data from the State University of New York Albany Center for Health Workforce Studies.

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Health Affairs

In many ways, health-sector jobs helped the US economy recover from the financial crisis of 2007–08: According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), between 2006 and 2016, 2.8 million jobs were added to the health sector at a rate of growth almost seven times faster than the rest of the economy. Over the decade, jobs in health care settings grew more the 20 percent, while jobs in the remainder of the economy only grew 3 percent. Although the BLS projects that the rate of growth in jobs in health care settings will decrease slightly in the decade from 2016 to 2026, the projected growth of jobs in health care settings (18 percent) will continue to be far more rapid than in the remainder of the economy, which is projected to grow at a rate of 6 percent. Thus, health care jobs are still projected to grow at three times the rate of the rest of the economy during the next decade.

Every two years the BLS publishes 10-year occupational and industry projections for employment in the US. The data cover hundreds of occupations and settings. The BLS also provides historical data on employment trends over the prior decade. To make the relevant data on health occupations and settings more accessible to the health community, the Center for Health Workforce Studies (CHWS) provides a report summarizing and analyzing the data for the health sector and health occupations. The CHWS report on the 2016–26 projections was recently released and has a wealth of interesting data. This posting provides some of the highlights of the recent BLS data from the CHWS report.

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BJNN

U.S. Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer (D–N.Y.) is backing a bill that would add 15,000 more Medicare-supported residency-training slots for doctors…

…Schumer’s release also cited a “recent major report” for the Center for Health Workforce Studies (CHWSNY) found that providers are “unevenly distributed” across New York.

CHWSNY, also based in Rensselaer, is part of the University at Albany’s School of Public Health.

The report found that Central New York has one of the “lowest rates” of family and general-practice physicians in the state, with only one primary-care doctor for every 1,330 people, Schumer’s office said.

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ASPPH

According to a new report by the Center for Health Workforce Studies (CHWS) at the University at Albany School of Public Health, health care employment grew by nearly 21 percent between 2006 and 2016, compared to only 3 percent job growth in all other employment sectors…

“This study finds that health care employment continues to be an important economic driver in the U.S.,” noted Dr. Robert Martiniano, CHWS Senior Program Manager. “The analysis also reflects changes in the health care delivery system, with more job growth in ambulatory and home care settings compared to hospitals.”…

…Dr. Jean Moore, CHWS director, states, “This report describes trends in health care employment that can help health care providers, educators, policymakers, and other stakeholders better understand current and future demand for health care workers.”  She also asserts that, “Changes underway in health care delivery and financing could impact future demand for health workers. Consequently, it is important to routinely monitor health care employment trends and projections.”

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Times Telegram

Sen. Charles Schumer wants to take action to forestall a growing shortage of physicians.

He visited Oneida Healthcare on Friday to call for passage of the Physician Shortage Act of 2018, which would create 15,000 more Medicare-supported training slots for medical residents. The number of doctors trained in this country is limited by the number of available residencies…

…Jean Moore, director of the Center for Health Workforce Studies at the University at Albany, took a more nuanced view of the bill. To some extent, physician shortages are in the eye of the beholder, she said.

“That’s a trick question,” she said. “There’s a lot of different answers depending on your perspective on that. We need to find ways to use the people that we have more efficiently and to recognize that a lot of times when we talk shortage, it’s really maldistribution.”

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Association of Schools & Programs of Public Health

Researchers at the University at Albany’s Center for Health Workforce Studies (CHWS) analyzed starting salary trends for physicians who completed graduate medical education (GME) training in New York over the past 15 years. Using data drawn from its annual Resident Exit Survey, researchers found that despite the growing percentage of women completing training in the state’s GME programs, pay gaps between newly trained male and female physicians persist and are in fact widening. Findings from this study are detailed in a recent research brief, “Gender Pay Gaps Widen for Newly Trained Physicians.

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